Thousands at Dallas rally push for unity, immigration reform

DALLAS — -

People from all walks of life marched Sunday through downtown Dallas, calling for unity and immigration reform.

According to Dallas police, the city estimates about 3,200 people attended. No arrests were made. Hundreds of police, constables and deputies were present making sure the crowd was safe.

The march began Sunday afternoon at the Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe in downtown Dallas, and ended at the City Hall Plaza. Officials closed several streets for the demonstration.

(Watch video from the rally here.)

Domingo Garcia, an organizer, said the event aimed to be a peaceful march. "This is a march where we are asking everyone to only wear red, white and blue, for the American flag. To only bring American flags, because this is really about America’s values," Garcia said.

A lineup of entertainers and speakers addressed the crowd. Scheduled speakers include Martin Luther King III, actors Jamie Foxx and Danny Glover, faith leaders, and several local and nationally known elected officials.

"We’re telling people not to bring any weapons. Not to bring any poles or two-by-fours with banners or flags, because we want to avoid any conflict," Garcia said.

Read more of our related coverage:

  • Immigration and bathrooms took over a good chunk of a floor debate on whether to keep the Texas Railroad Commission functioning until 2029. In the end, lawmakers voted unanimously to tentatively send the bill to the Senate.
  • No issue stirred more passion in the 2016 elections than border security and immigration. In Beyond The Wall, a Texas Tribune documentary, we look past the heated rhetoric to explore why people and dope keep pouring across the border.

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2017/04/09/thousands-dallas-rally-push-unity-immigration-reform/.

 

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